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Mayweather, He Is Too Quick For Marquez, Who's Next ?

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Saturday night’s fight between Floyd Mayweather, jr. and Juan Manuel Marquez reminded me of my childhood when this older boy picked on a smaller boy and then expected acclaim for making the younger boy cry. Mayweather jr. overpowered the smaller, lighter Marquez from the opening bell. Mayweather’s left hooks seemed to land every time. In the second round one of these lefts caught Marquez coming in and knocked him off his feet. Round after round Mayweather peppered Marquez with countless blows. At one point HBO’s color commentator, Jim Lampley, announced Mayweather, with his four inch reach advantage, had landed over 60% of his punches while Marquez landed only 12%.

At the end of 12 non-competitive rounds Mayweather received a unanimous decision victory to remain unbeaten at 40-0. The judges’ score cards read: 118-109, 120-107 and 119-108, all for Mayweather.
However impressive the victory, shouldn’t Mayweather fight people his own size? If we weigh the obvious disadvantages (height, weight and strength) why would Marquez, the Nevada boxing commission or for that matter Marquez’s manager sanction such a bout? Of course it was all about money and Marquez being such a draw with boxing fans.
Yes, boxing remains a great sport as long as we don’t have the great big bully beating up on the small-fry. Plain and simple, HBO had us watch a fight between a natural light-weight (Marquez) and a welterweight (Mayweather); weight classes that are separated by twelve pounds.
Throughout the PPV telecast only Emanuel Steward spoke negatively about the size issue when he said, “If the fighters would have been the same weight, it could have been a whole different story. That’s why they have the different weight classes in boxing.” What Steward was aluding to was the fact that Mayweather, a welterweight, never even made a concerted effort to abide by the rules of his contract with Marquez. With the catch weight being 144 pounds, Mayweather was to come down at least six pounds and his opponent Marquez was to come up nine pounds. Since he ignored the contractual weight, his body was bigger and muscles stronger and every punch would pack a heftier wallop. In other words, Mayweather didn’t have to take the padding out of his gloves or use plaster of paris, he was gaining his advantage with the extra weight.

Saturday night’s fight between Floyd Mayweather, jr. and Juan Manuel Marquez reminded me of my childhood when this older boy picked on a smaller boy and then expected acclaim for making the younger boy cry. Mayweather jr. overpowered the smaller, lighter Marquez from the opening bell. Mayweather’s left hooks seemed to land every time. In the second round one of these lefts caught Marquez coming in and knocked him off his feet. Round after round Mayweather peppered Marquez with countless blows. At one point HBO’s color commentator, Jim Lampley, announced Mayweather, with his four inch reach advantage, had landed over 60% of his punches while Marquez landed only 12%.
At the end of 12 non-competitive rounds Mayweather received a unanimous decision victory to remain unbeaten at 40-0. The judges’ score cards read: 118-109, 120-107 and 119-108, all for Mayweather.
However impressive the victory, shouldn’t Mayweather fight people his own size? If we weigh the obvious disadvantages (height, weight and strength) why would Marquez, the Nevada boxing commission or for that matter Marquez’s manager sanction such a bout? Of course it was all about money and Marquez being such a draw with boxing fans.
Yes, boxing remains a great sport as long as we don’t have the great big bully beating up on the small-fry. Plain and simple, HBO had us watch a fight between a natural light-weight (Marquez) and a welterweight (Mayweather); weight classes that are separated by twelve pounds.
Throughout the PPV telecast only Emanuel Steward spoke negatively about the size issue when he said, “If the fighters would have been the same weight, it could have been a whole different story. That’s why they have the different weight classes in boxing.” What Steward was aluding to was the fact that Mayweather, a welterweight, never even made a concerted effort to abide by the rules of his contract with Marquez. With the catch weight being 144 pounds, Mayweather was to come down at least six pounds and his opponent Marquez was to come up nine pounds. Since he ignored the contractual weight, his body was bigger and muscles stronger and every punch would pack a heftier wallop. In other words, Mayweather didn’t have to take the padding out of his gloves or use plaster of paris, he was gaining his advantage with the extra weight.

There is a lesson to be learned from this fight. In the Marquez camp everyone seemed so trusting and their fighter’s limitless confidence bordered on delusional. The two mugs training Floyd Mayweather jr., his father, Floyd Mayweather Sr. and his uncle, Roger Mayweather, kept things real. The Mayweather family may come off as a bunch of buffoons on camera but in the end, who got their way?
Random thoughts and observations:
Could Manny Pacquiao do any better against Mayweather? I don’t think so.
How unprofessional was this? After just six rounds into the fight the referee, Tony Weeks, came over to Marquez’s corner and asked, “Do you want to continue?” Didn’t he know Marquez is genuine Mexican, not De La Hoya Mexican? Of course he wanted to fight to the bitter end.
The saddened Marquez faithful that I spoke to never expected such a landslide. Even his manager told him just prior to the final round, “All that is left is your dignity.”
Next time Floyd Mayweather, jr. is fighting, perhaps they should have someone stand by with a beeper to mute out the profanity. Roger Mayweather has what some people call a potty mouth.
 
On the under-card
WBA featherweight title: Rocky Juarez (28-5-1, 13 KO) versus Chris John (43-0-2, 22 KO): In their previous meeting back in March, Juarez used a late surge to even the scorecards and earn a draw. This time he waited too long as John out-boxed the smaller more compact fighter right up until the final round.
Then in the final round Juarez brought the crowd to their feet as he came out throwing punches from every angle. In the closing minute a left hook caught John right on the button. Though visibly hurt by the punch and wobbling, John miraculously stayed on his feet until the final bell sounded.
WBO interim lightweight title: Vicente Escobedo (21-2, 13 KO) versus Michael Katsidis (26-2, 21 KO): Michael Katsidis played the part of the bully in this one, applying constant pressure that befuddled Escobedo who spent the entire fight backing up. The Australian won the title by split decision, the same title he won back in 2007.
Katsidis held the belt until suffering a TKO loss to Joel Casamayor on March 22, 2008. Escobedo proved resilient, weathering combinations and proving to be extremely elusive even though his back was against the ropes much of the fight. But by the twelfth round it was clear that Katsidis's stamina was overwhelming the California-based fighter when he suffered the most visible damage of the night, a deep cut over his right eye.
NABO featherweight title: Cornelius Lock (19-4-1, 12 KO) versus Orlando Cruz (16-1-1, 7 KO): The favored fighter, Cruz, from Puerto Rico, withstood a number of onslaughts before finally succumbing to a big right hook from Lock in the fifth round that put him down for good. Lock showed explosive punching power early, scoring a knockdown in the very first round. Cruz battled back in the second round and was smiling at the end of the third despite eating a flurry of punches right before the bell.
 

 

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